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Hyperlinks

When it comes to creating links, the key thing to keep in mind is that the links should make sense out of context. Visually impaired users will be listening to your link text and at times will jump from link to link in order to quickly find content. Insufficiently descriptive links will lead to confusion. Use words and short phrases to describe where the links go and what information can be found. The following examples illustrate recommended practices for creating accessible links.

Don't Use "Click Here"

Such a link is not only ambiguous, but it's also redundant in that screen readers automatically indicate when reading a link. Do not use "click" or "link" in any of your links.

Don't: For more information about accessibility, click here.

Do: Read more information about accessibility.

Use Text Rather than URLs

Web addresses are not descriptive and don't make much sense when read aloud by a screen reader.

Don't: For more information about accessibility, visit https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20.

Do: Visit the W3C website for more information about accessibility.

Keep It Short

Screen readers cannot abbreviate and will read the entire text of a link. For example:

Don't: Learn more about how to make your website compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

Do:  Learn more about how to make your website compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), part of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.